Archive

Art & Culture

This week we chatted with Sharon Hardy, the photographer and brains behind Sweet Potato Pet Photos. In the latest installment of our interview series, Sharon discusses her transition from working for Conan O’Brien’s late night shows to becoming a pet photographer, her portrait style, and the countless outdoor backdrops Los Angeles has to offer.

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This week we chatted with Genevieve Santos of Le Petit Elefant, her online store that specializes in toys, crafts, and artwork. In the latest installment of our interview series, Genevieve discusses her transition from working in the film industry to setting up her own shop, her stint as a volunteer at an elephant sanctuary in Thailand, and her favorite biking spots in Los Angeles and the Bay Area.

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This week we chatted with Megan Weinerman, a freelance copywriter, author, and artist based out of Chicago. In the latest installment of our interview series, Megan discusses how she got into writing, her intuitive artistic style, and the Windy City’s growing startup community.

Twenty Two: Let’s start with the basics. Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

Megan: What would you like to know? Where I was born? NYC. Where I was raised? City of Chicago. What do I do? Freelance writer in advertising.

Twenty Two: Have you always been interested in writing?

Megan: No, I fell into it. It was like an accident. I was working in TV production in NYC for VH1 and I started writing in a journal, doing improv, and studying stand-up. Shit like that.

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For last week’s edition of Ask the Panel, we learned about our panelists’ favorite movies. Some were foreign films hailing from places as far as Hong Kong, while others were set in the heart of Alabama. While some were classic coming-of-age flicks like The Breakfast Club and 10 Things I Hate About You, others focused on blowing stuff up or the really, really, ridiculously good looking.

This week, we want to know what books our panelists curl up to on a lazy Sunday afternoon. Without further ado, we’ll continue the series with the following question:

Which books would you recommend to all of your friends?

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This week we chatted with Adolfo J Lara, an artist, director, and photographer based in Los Angeles. In the latest installment of our interview series, Adolfo discusses his affinity towards street art, his various sources of inspiration, and some advice for aspiring street artists.

Twenty Two: Let’s start with the basics. Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

Adolfo: My name is Adolfo. I’m 23, male, 5’11” (probably 6′ soon — I’m drinking a lot of milk), Mexican, filmmaker, artist, photographer, non-heartthrob, Los Angeles.

Twenty Two: What inspired you to get involved with street art as opposed to more traditional genres?

Adolfo: I like street art/graffiti because it allows me to put my work right in people’s faces, instead of waiting for them to visit my website or whatever. I can do something really cool in my sketchbook and no one will see it, but I can take that same thing and put it on a busy intersection and hundreds of people will see it.

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This week we chatted with Amy Creyer, a social media consultant and the photographer behind Chicago Street Style. In the latest installment of our interview series, Amy discusses growing up in Greenwich Village and Arkansas, her inspiration behind starting the popular street style blog, and her own personal style.

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This week, we chatted with Phyliss Ha Siler of Rue 7, a couture event and photography company based out of Los Angeles. In this latest installment of our interview series, Phyliss shared her background as a creative in multiple industries, how she brings editorial-style concepting and quality to the public, and why she’d love to take on the LA Auto Show in the future.

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This week we chatted with Victoria Vu, an architect and the brains behind a stationery company called Paper & Type. In the latest installment of our interview series, Victoria discusses her beginnings with letterpress, her affinity towards written correspondence, and how living in Los Angeles has influenced her work.

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This week’s interview is with Sarah Rodenhouse, one of the founders and Artistic Directors of the MashUp Contemporary Dance Company in Los Angeles. Although MashUp was founded only a couple years ago, this all-female dance troupe is making waves as it brings an interesting mixture of jazz, hip-hop, and modern dance to the national stage.

Learn more about one of the group’s founders and how she started a non-profit troupe from scratch.

Twenty Two: Let’s start with the basics. Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

Sarah: I’m originally an upstate New Yorker with four awesome brothers and parents who have turned into two of my best friends. I’ve wanted to be a dancer since my mom and dad bought the Michael Jackson Thriller album and my older brother and I played it into the ground, dancing around the living room.

I’ve been in LA for about seven years now with a year stint in NYC somewhere during that span. I absolutely love being outside and I’m active as hell which is why I think LA and I have gotten along fairly well so far!

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